How To Sprout Beans Including Adzuki, Garbanzo, Lentil, Peas and Mung Beans

Lentil Beans Sprouted and Ready To Eat

Learning how to sprout beans is essential as bean sprouts are a great to grow as they are crunchy and delicious in nature and a great addition to any meal. One cup of any bean sprout seeds will yield 2 cups of bean sprouts. On average, they take 2-5 days to sprout and need to be soaked overnight. A bag or jar method is the best way to grow the bean sprout as they are generally shorter sprouts growing to an inch long on average.

Using lentil sprouts as an example of how to sprout beans, you will want to choose the method for sprouting first. Both the bag and jar method are very effective ways to sprouting bean sprouts.

Soak the lentil sprout seeds overnight in cold water for about 8-12 hours. You want to use enough lentil seeds to fill about 1/3 of the bag or jar.

Consistently rinse the lentil sprouts 2-3 times a day, making sure the water is never cloudy, until they are about an inch in length or longer. The lentil sprouts are now ready to eat.

Lentil sprouts are slightly peppery, peas, adzuki, mung beans and garbanzo or chick peas are very mild. Other bean sprouts include soy beans, kidney beans, navy beans and pinto beans.

All of these bean sprouts are bursting with enzymes and high in nutrition. Now you know how to sprout beans, it is really your preference which variety you choose to sprout.

Buying Seeds for Sprouting: Why It is Important

May 14, 2009 by  
Filed under Seeds For Sprouting

There Are So Many Great Seeds For Sprouting

There Are So Many Great Seeds For Sprouting

It is important when you buy seeds for sprouting that you buy seeds that are designed for sprouting and from a reputable company.

Here is a quick list of things you should look for when buying seeds for sprouting:

  1. The sprouting seeds must not have any human pathogens.
  2. The sprouting seeds must not have plant pathogens.
  3. The sprouting seeds should be uniform in size and color.
  4. The sprouting seeds should have a high quick germination.
  5. The sprouting seeds should not be scarified and should have very few damaged seeds.
  6. The sprouting seeds should have a low moisture content but not so low as to damage the seed.
  7. The sprouts produced from the seeds for sprouting should germinate uniformly and show good vigour.
  8. The seeds for sprouting should have few over-soaks (over-soaks are seeds that soften quickly when put in water.)
  9. The age of the seed is important. Some seed is best if aged, while others are not.
  10. The sprouts from the seeds for sprouting should have a good flavor and shelf life.

Of course no one expects you to look for these things when you are buying sprouting seeds, which is why you need to buy seeds for sprouting from a reputable company.

If you purchase seeds that aren’t designed for sprouting, you may face problems such as a contaminated seed for example one with salmonella bacteria. More commonly though, you will end up with seeds that won’t sprout and will start to rot in the sprouter.

Again, purchase seeds for sprouting from a company that specializes in seeds for sprouting as their quality will be superior.

Buckwheat Sprouts: How to Grow Them and Why They’re Good For You

May 13, 2009 by  
Filed under Buckwheat Sprouts

Buckwheat Seeds For Sprouting

Buckwheat Seeds For Sprouting

Buckwheat is a plant that has small, dark seeds that are pyramid like in shape. People will celiac disease can consume buckwheat in its hulled form as it is an herb and not wheat at all.

Buckwheat sprouts are not only super delicious but really fun to sprout. They have a sweet and delicate taste and thin leaves.

When mature, buckwheat sprouts have rich red stems, and round deep green leaves. You will know they’re ready to eat when most of the hulls have fallen off.

The best way to grow buckwheat sprouts is to use a basket or tray method. They can grow to be 4-5 inches tall making them a longer variety of sprout and are usually ready to eat in 8-12 days. Make sure the buckwheat spouts seeds you buy are raw, black, organic, unhulled and for sprouting.

You can sprout using a plastic colander to mimic a basket or a bamboo basket, make sure they are free from shellac. A heavy duty, wide weave basket will allow the root systems of the buckwheat sprouts to cling on to the basket and adapt themselves to the basket allowing the seedlings to grow.

You can speed up the process and help the buckwheat sprouts grow by creating a greenhouse dome out of plastic. Simply cut the sides of a grocery bag and tuck in the ends underneath the basket to create an air bubble. This will help retain moisture, maintain temperature, and allow UW rays, as well as light.

Only disrupt the greenhouse when rinsing your buckwheat sprouts. You should rinse the buckwheat sprouts at least 2-3 a day with cold water. Try to use a shower spray. When the roots have fastened themselves to the basket or colander, you can rinse by soaking the buckwheat sprouts in a sink of cold water and even tilting them upside down to make hull removal easier.

Also make sure, during the first few days you keep your buckwheat sprouts in a shaded area. Avoid direct sunlight and make sure the temperature in the greenhouse tent doesn’t exceed 100 degrees and ruin your buckwheat sprouts.

Buckwheat sprouts are also a rich source of chlorophyll, magnesium, vitamins b (including choline and inosoitol) and c, calcium and lecithin, a fatty substance that helps the body eliminate cholesterol.

Buckwheat Sprouts Tip: In the first 5-6 days, make sure you rinse the buckwheat seeds well as the hulls are quite large and can easily develop fungus. A good thorough washing though will eliminate any potential mold.

Growing Cheap Healthy Food At Home

May 13, 2009 by  
Filed under Cheap Healthy Food

Cheap Healthy Food in Days

Cheap Healthy Food in Days

Growing cheap healthy food at home is so easy. You can plant a garden in the backyard with pre bought plants like carrots, onions, tomatoes and other family favourites and have it ready to eat in a few weeks.

A faster and easier alternative though to the traditional garden when growing cheap healthy food is growing sprouts. You also don’t need to worry about soil as sprouts can be grown hydroponically with just water.

Sprouts are ready to eat in as little as a day, such as sunflower, almond and sesame, or 2-3 days like soybeans, wheatberries, adzuki and mung beans. Not only are you getting an extremely rich source of nutrition, but the price per cup of sprouts works out to pennies per cup! This truly makes sprouts a winner in the cheap healthy food category.

You don’t need expensive equipment to start either, you simply need an old glass jar that can hold 500ml or so, sprouting seeds, a fine mesh screen and some elastic bands.

Using mung beans an example – Soak 3 tablespoons of mung beans sprouting seeds overnight and place them into the glass jar the next day. You then want to seal the mesh screen on the top with some elastic bands and continue to rinse through the mesh once in the morning and once at night with cold water. Continue to do so until sprouts are about 2 cm in length and ready to eat in a few days.

Mung beans sprouted, are about 18 cents a cup and are great with salads, soups, sandwiches and more!  Growing cheap healthy food has never been easier!

The Sprout Bag: How to Use It and Why You Should Use It

May 12, 2009 by  
Filed under Sprout Bag

A Simple Sprout Bag With Sprouting Seeds Inside

A Simple Sprout Bag With Sprouting Seeds Inside

The premise behind the sprout bag is very simple. To start soak your sprouting seeds overnight and pour the soaked seeds into your pre-moistened sprout bag. Use the draw string to close the sprout bag, and then give your sprouts a quick rinse. Hang sprout bags to dry on a hook or knob; you can even put it on a dish rack.

Continue to rinse your sprout bags twice a day with cold water, no more than 12 hours apart. The roots from the sprouting seeds should start to come through. If you cannot be home to rinse, put them in the fridge until you can or bring them with you. While rinsing, grab the ends of the sprout bag and shake the sprouts to give them more room to grow and prevent sprouts from clumping.

Once your sprouts are ready to eat, store them in the fridge and give them a rinse once every 2nd or 3rd day. They will last anywhere from 1 – 2 weeks.

Sprout bags are made from a wide variety of materials, but it is recommended that you use sprout bags made from organic hemp or organic crude linen which is actually from the flax plant. These materials are resistant to tearing and drain perfectly.

Cotton although natural is a highly sprayed plant and shrinks when it is wet. This can lead to mold and other problems as the sprouts will not get enough air circulation and have limited water drainage.

The benefits of using a sprout bag include the maximum exposure to oxygen your sprouts get, its lightweight nature and how easy it is to use.

Using a jar limits the amount of oxygen that can go to the sprouting seeds, using a sprout bag will allow maximum oxygen exposure and perfect drainage. Fungus and growth problems occur because there is too little air and too much moisture.

As mentioned, sprout bags are also lightweight and easy for you to carry wherever you go. Trays can take up a lot of space in your kitchen and you could never take that with you on a trip. Glass jars can break easily and are not ideal for travelling.

Sprout Bag Tips: Fill your sprout bag to 1/3 capacity with dry seed to leave room for your sprout seeds to grow. A 7 x 12 inch sprout bag will sprout 1 – 2 ½ cups of dry grains or beans.

Hands on Sprouting DVD: Learn The Secrets Of Sprouting At Home

May 12, 2009 by  
Filed under Sprouting DVD

sprouting-dvd

Sprouting DVD Release Date: November 20, 2008
Run Time: 60 minutes
Highly Recommended: 5/5 Sprouts

Reading a book on sprouting can be time consuming and confusing. If you want to learn how to sprout right away and watch someone demonstrate to you how to do it, the Hands on Sprouting DVD – Learn the Secrets of Sprouting at Home is for you!

Trefor Randall a.k.a. the Sprouting Guru shows, explains and demonstrates, step by step, how to create your own organic healthy sprout farm at home. At the end of the DVD you will be able to grow fresh, living superfoods in your kitchen.

This sprouting DVD is the complete “how to sprout” video, showing you how to successfully sprout both hydroponically and with soil. You will also learn about a wide range of sprouts, how to save both time and money, and lots more.

As we all know, sprouts have long been considered a health food. Recent studies show that in addition to being a superb source of nutrients, sprouts contain concentrated amounts of phytochemicals that can protect us against cancer. Sprouts are simply bursting with enzymes, vitamins, and minerals!

Growing your own sprouts is both cheap and rewarding. You now have the opportunity to grow organic sprouts without paying for organic pricing. This DVD is a must have for those who enjoy eating fresh grown sprouts with their salads, sandwiches, soups and more.

Much of the food today goes through radiation processes, or sit in refrigerated warehouses for months before they reach the market, while the ‘general shopper’ has no idea, but buys just because it’s there!  Now you will know that your food is actually fresh, clean and organic because you made them. Buy this DVD now.

A Sprouting Chart of Sprouts From Adzuki to Wheatgrass

May 11, 2009 by  
Filed under Sprouting Chart

Replace The Lid With A Mesh For Easy Seed Rinsing

Replace The Lid With A Mesh For Easy Seed Rinsing

The following is a sprouting chart we compiled of the most common seeds used for sprouting and some unconventional ones.

When looking at this sprouting chart, look at the method recommended first and the amount to use.  That way you can prepare yourself by having the right materials.  For example, if you want to sprout broccoli, it is recommended that you use a tray and use about 2-3 tablespoons of seeds.  This means that you have to have a tray to sprout and enough broccoli seeds to sprout.  If not, go out and buy the materials before you begin.

When soaking your seeds, set the seeds aside in a bowl or a jar that is large enough for the seeds to expand without problems.  This especially holds true for beans that can easily double in size.  We recommend using a jar, as it is easier to rinse in if you have a fine mesh filter at the top.  If you don’t you can easily create one by purchasing a mesh screen and using a few rubber bands to secure it at the top.

All seeds should be soaked overnight unless stated otherwise.

If you are sprouting with a tray make sure you distribute the seeds evenly.  If sprouting with a bag, soak the seeds overnight, pour the soaked seeds into a pre-moistened sprout bag, rinse and hang.

You should always rinse your sprouts on a daily basis until the water turns clear.

This sprouting chart is by no means comprehensive, if you would like to see a sprout added on to here please contact us!

Sprout

Taste

Amount to use

Method

Amount of days ready

Special Instructions

Adzuki

Crisp and crunchy

1 cup

Bag or jar

4-5 days

Alfalfa

Mild

4-5 tbsp

Tray

3-6 days

Amaranth

Mild

5 tbsp

Tray

3-5 days

Rinse the sprouts 4 – 6 times a day to speed up sprouting process.

Broccoli

Strong and crispy

2-3 tbsp

Tray

5-6 days

Brown mustard

Spicy

2-3 tbsp

Tray

5 days

Buckwheat

Soft

5 tbsp

Tray

10 days

Do not over soak. 20 minutes to an hour should be fine.  Rinse until water is clear 3-6 times a day

Cabbage

Strong, crispy

2-3 tbsp

Tray

5-6 days

Chia

Mild with gelatine

3 tbsp

Clay

12 days

Clover

Spicy

4-5 tbsp

Tray

6-7 days

Fenugreek

Strong and crispy

4-5 tbsp

Tray

7-8 days

Garbanzo

Mild and crunchy

2 cups

Bag or jar

4 days

Garlic

Potent, garlic-like

2-3 tbsp

Tray

12 days

Green pea

Hardy and big

2 cups

Bag or jar

4-5 days

Hard wheat

Sweet and crunchy

2 cups

Bag or jar

2-3 days

Hulled sunflower

Nutty

1 cup

Bag or jar

2 days

Kale

Strong and crispy

2-3 tbsp

Tray

6 days

Kamut

Hardy and crunchy

3 cups

Tray or bag

3 days

Lentil

Crisp and crunchy

1 cup

Bag or jar

4-5 days

Mung

Crispy, crunchy and mild

1 cup

Bag or jar

5-6 days

Rinse at least 3 times a day.

Onion

Strong, onion-like

2-3 tbsp

Tray

12 days

Peanut

Hardy

1 cup

Bag or jar

4-5 days

Organic Sprouting Seeds versus Non Organic Sprouting Seeds

Organic Garbanzo (a.k.a. Chickpeas) Sprouting Seeds

It is important to choose organic sprouting seeds for sprouting.

Organic sprouting seeds taken from plants are grown without the use of man-made chemical fertilizers, herbicides and pesticides. Non organic sprouting seeds on the other hand usually come from plants that are grown on soil that has been heavily fertilized with petrochemicals. The plants themselves have been exposed and sprayed with a large amount of harmful chemicals to keep away pests and weeds.

Not only does petrochemical farming have the short term effect of destroying topsoil, it will also work to destroy our health. Buying organic sprouting seeds will help you obtain optimal health while supporting organic farmers who work hard to nurture the soil and give back to the earth rather than deplete it.

Organic sprouting seeds are also enriched by organic farmers with natural fertilizers such as manure, rock sediment, comport, worms, good bacteria and algae cultures.

Look at the labeling on the package when buying organic sprouting seeds to make sure that they are certified organic or that the seeds are indeed harvested for sprouting.  The organic label will ensure that the seeds are not genetically modified.  But make sure you read labels and know the company that you are purchasing from and when in doubt ask.

Make sure your organic sprouting seeds are clean, and uniform in shape, size and color.  Broken, chipped or otherwise damaged seeds will give you problems in the future – they may not sprout, or will rot when sprouting.

They’re shouldn’t be any pebbles, sticks, dirt, or other debris with the seeds. Whenever you can, buy organic sprouting seeds in bulk as it is the cheapest way to sprout.

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